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Reinventing Broadway Street: Los Angeles' Architectural Reincarnation


“Reinventing Broadway Street: Los Angeles’ Architectural Reincarnation“ is California author Marques Vickers’ second celebratory pictorial edition recounting the evolution and transformation of one of downtown Los Angeles’ primary boulevards. The 215-page book features over 200 exterior photographs of the structures with their architectural details that line the blocks of North and South Broadway Street in the center of downtown Los Angeles. The book traces colorful legends, anecdotes and landmarks that preceded current standing constructions.

Broadway Street was originally identified as Fort Street in the initial 1849 city tract created by U.S. Army map surveyor Lieutenant Edward Ord. The Fort referenced Fort Moore Hill, a prominent and strategic incline that overlooked the early settlement. The Fort Moore district served as one of the city’s first burial grounds and was later leveled to construct the Hollywood Freeway. In 1890, Broadway Street was permanently renamed.

The Los Angeles El Pueblo settlement was established in the mid-18th century along the then fertile banks of the Los Angeles River. The colony’s terrain was agriculturally cultivated for vineyards, cattle ranching and later citrus groves before an encroaching urban environment altered the complexion of city towards the close of the 19th century.

 Drawing from varied archival documentation and narratives, Vickers traces the evolutionary stages of Broadway Street into the city’s commercial and entertainment center. Broadway’s reputation extended throughout the first half of the twentieth century but was followed by a prolonged period of four-decade stagnation. The most current reinvention has introduced retail, office and residential mixed-use developments. This synergy of change, however, has been slowed by existing retail lease commitments contracted during the street’s lean years of decline.

“Reinventing Broadway Street” documents numerous colorful and influential contributors to the local history. Among the profiled personalities include Oliver Morosco, John Temple, William Wolfskill, Jean-Luis Vignes, Abel and Arcadia Sterns, Isaias Hellman, Joaquin Murrieta, John C. Fremont, John Parkinson, Prudent Beaudry, Sarah Bernhardt, Harris Newmark, and many others.

The book profiles over 65 existing distinctive building’s lineage and their unique legacies. The structures photographed include the Times Mirror Square, Bradbury, Irvine-Byrne, Hosfield, Zobel, Trustee, O. T. Johnson #1 and #2, Junipero Serra, Metropolitan, Judson Rives, Bumiller, Chester Williams, Remick and Grayson, Schulte United, J. W. Gold, Story, Desmond, Jewelry Trade, Mercantile Arcade, Norton, Hass, Merritt, Clifton’s Brookside and Schaber’s Cafeterias, Yorkshire Hotel, Garland, Charles C. Chapman, Eastern Columbia, Wurlitzer, Brown-Israel, Broadway Leasehold, Platt, Western Pacific, Howard Huntington, Case Hotel and Los Angeles Herald Examiner.

Theatres include The Million Dollar, Roxie, Cameo, Los Angeles, Palace, Globe, Tower, Rialto, Orpheum, Arcade and United Artists. Former department store buildings includes The May Company, Bullock’s, Swelldom’s, F. W. Woolworth’s, National Dollar Store, S. H. Kress, Broadway, Silverwood’s, Hartfield’s, and Barker Brothers. Notable government constructions  include the LA County Hall of Record, Justice Building, Foltz Criminal Justice Center and the nearly completed Federal Courthouse Building.

“Reinventing Broadway Street” takes the reader on a stroll through the history, present and progressive future envisioned and being created simultaneously.


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"ETERNAL SPRING: Los Angeles' Architectural Reincarnation"

“Eternal Spring Street: Los Angeles’ Architectural Reincarnation“ is California author Marques Vickers’ celebratory pictorial edition recounting the evolution and transformation of one of downtown Los Angeles’ primary boulevards. The 178-page book features over 115 exterior photographs of buildings and architectural details that line the blocks of North and South Spring Street. The book traces colorful legends, anecdotes and landmarks that preceded current standing constructions.

The once modest dirt highway was originally called the Old Brea Road, servicing as a major commercial artery originating from the Los Angeles’ El Pueblo settlement and separating in the direction of the LaBrea Tar Pits and the Cahuenga Pass (present day Hollywood). Spring Street officially derived its name from Trinidad Primavera Ortega, the girlfriend of Lieutenant Edward Ord who drafted the city’s initial survey map in 1849 that included street naming rights. Primavera is the Spanish name for Spring and Ord designated the honor to Ortega (the nickname he called her). She was also the granddaughter of Spanish explorer Jose Francisco Ortega.

The El Pueblo settlement was established in the mid-18th century along the then fertile banks of the Los Angeles River. The colony’s terrain was agriculturally cultivated for vineyards, cattle ranching and later citrus groves before an encroaching urban environment altered the complexion of city towards the close of the 19th century.

Drawing from varied archival documentation and narratives, Vickers traces the four stages of evolution of Spring’s transformation including: 1) retail center, 2) cradle of Silent Film movie production offices, 3) bank and financial institution headquarters and 4) contemporary retail, office and residential mixed-use developments. The most current Spring Street reinvention followed a prolonged period of four-decade stagnation following World War II.

The book profiles each distinctive building’s architectural lineage and unique legacy that have been often historically overlooked. In particular, the Alexandria Hotel on the corner of South Spring and West Fifth Streets is prominently profiled for its substantial role in the genesis of the film industry. The Alexandria, between its opening in 1906 and decline with the emergence of the neighboring Biltmore Hotel, was the residential home, office and networking center for many of the most prominent patriarchal actors, directors and producers.

“Eternal Spring Street” further documents numerous colorful and influential contributors to the local opulent history. Among the profiled personalities include John Temple, William Wolfskill, Jean-Luis Vignes, Abel and Arcadia Sterns, Pio Pico, Isaias Hellman, Joaquin Murrieta (his severed and pickled head), Ozro Childs, John C. Fremont, John Parkinson, Prudent Beaudry, George Lehman, Biddy Mason, Remi Nadeau, Sarah Bernhardt (her severed leg), James J. Jeffries, George Ralphs and many others.

The buildings photographed include: the Los Angeles City Hall Complex, United States Court House, Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center, Los Angeles Times Building, First and Los Angeles Street Metro Station Entrance. Douglas Building, Hotel Ramona and Washington Building, Ronald Reagan Building, Herman Hellman and Banco Popular Building, Title Insurance Building, Crocker Citizen National Bank, The Braly/Continental Building, Hellman Annex Building, El Dorado/Stowell Hotel, Rowan and Chester Building, Alexandria Hotel, Spring Street Arcade Building, Pacific Southwest Bank, Security Building, Security Trust and Savings and Los Angeles Theatre Center, Merchant and Lloyd’s Bank, Hotel Hayward, E. F. Hutton, California Canadian Bank, Barclays Bank, A. G. Bartlett Building, United California Bank, Los Angeles Stock Exchange, Mortgage Guaranty Building, Banks and Huntley Building, Hellman Commercial Trust and Savings Bank and Bank of America, I. N. Van Nuys Building. 755 South Spring Street Project Construction, Lane Mortgage/Anjac Fashion Tower and Fenton Building, William May Garland Building. Marsh and Strong Building, Financial Center Building, Corporation Building and Renco Films, Great Republic Life Building and National City Tower Building.

The edition stresses Spring Street’s resiliency towards adaptation enabling its current revival and relevance. The architecture features reveals some of the most pronounced and stunning aesthetics of the early 20th century.


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Marquis Publishing is a publisher of paperback and electronic books.


MARQUIS PUBLISHING
California, USA
1 (707) 712-8062

marques@artsinamerica.com


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Robinson, West Seventh Street, Larronde Building, Schumacher Block, Benton Hotel, Los Angeles City Hall, The Grand Park, Spring Street junction, Market and Court Streets, West Ninth Street, South Main Street, first lager beer, John Schumacher’s single room grocery store, Schumacher Block, Wurtemberg, Germany, Sutter’s Creek, first ladies cocktail, Peach and Honey, dose of peach brandy, Los Angeles Common Council, Tivoli Pleasure Gardens, Henry Sohms, Music Center on Grand Avenue, condominium sales tanked, 2007-2010 real estate recession, 32-Floor Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring, architects John Parkinson, John C. Austin and Albert C. Martin, Sr., Mausoleum of Mausolus, The United States Court House, 312 North Spring, Gilbert Stanley Underwood, Louis A. Simon, The U.S. District Court, La Cronica, Los Angeles Times, 15 South Spring Street, Eulogio F. deCelis, San Fernando Valley, Rancho San Francisco, Santa Susana Mountains, Simi Hills, Rancho Tujunga, Santa Monica Mountains, La Reform, Los Angeles Daily Herald, Remi Nadeau, Mojave Desert, Cerro Gordo, Calico, San Fernando, Newhall, Soledad, Nadeau Hotel, Lotta Crabtree, Lola Montez, Mark Twain, Lily Langtry, Sarah Bernhardt, boxing champion John L. Sullivan, explorer Henry Stanley, Bryson-Bonebrake Block Building, Queen Ann, Mayor John Bryson, Sr., Major George H. Bonebrake, Los Angeles Brewing Company, Gordon B. Kaufmann, the Los Angeles Daily Times, Mirror Printing Office and Book Bindery, Harrison Gray Otis, Colonel H. H. Boyce, West First and South Broadway Streets, 531 South Spring, James and John McNamara, Clarence Darrow, San Quentin prison, Folsom prison, Leopold and Loeb, Ossian Street and John T. 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Lee Burton , Architects F. J. Capitain, J. Lee Burton, Richardsonian Romanesque, Café Royal restaurant, Ignace Jan Paderwski, Polish independence from Germany, Carlo Modini-Wood, William Hayes Perry, Los Angeles City Water Company, actor Robert Stack, Los Angeles Theatre, Orpheum Theatre, Orpheum Circuit vaudeville, Fischer’s Lyceum Theatre, Lyceum Theatre, The Evolution of Printing, Tony Sheets, Los Angeles Herald, Christopher and Sparks, 241 South Spring, John Koster 233 South Spring, Merrlam and Company 127 South Spring, Service 609 South Broadway, Lakin Brothers 419 South Seventh, Wells Candy Company 447 South Spring, and H. A. Bingham 605 South Broadway, ice cream consortium, The Ice Cream Manufacturers of Southern California, L. J. Christopher, Isaac Lankershim, Isaac Lankershim Mansion, Issac Van Nuys, Pio Pico, Alta California, Pico Hotel, 424 North Main, Levi Strauss, San Fernando Farm Homestead Association, Lankershim and Van Nuys families, Farmers and Merchants National Bank of Los Angeles, Van Nuys Hotel at West Fourth and South Main Streets, I. N. Van Nuys Building at South Spring and West Seventh Streets, 253 South Spring, Evergreen Cemetery, poor financial decisions, bad business practices, gambling, usury payments to loansharks, fraud and extravagance. Calvary Cemetery on North Broadway Street, Douglas Building, 257 South Spring, T. D. Stimson, James and Merritt Reid, Southern Pacific Railroad, Wilcox Block Building, Pissis and Moore, Classical Revival façade, California Club, Southwestern School of Law, Metropolitan News-Enterprise, 1971 Sylmar Earthquake, Pacific Coast Baseball Minor League, 226 South Spring, Peter Maier, Los Angeles Angels, Vernon Tigers, Lang, Phillips, Lowman and Germain Buildings. California Theatre, 238 South Spring, Columbia Theatre, Theodore Van de Kamp, Lawrence Frank, Great Depression, Van de Kamp family, General Baking Company, John Van de Kamp, Lawry’s Restaurant, Tam O’Shanter Inn, Aurora Foods, Stimson Block Building, Joe’s Auto Parks Garage, American Savings Bank, 220 South Spring, Roundhouse Garden of Paradise, Ramon Alexander, Eastern Coast of Africa, George Lehman, Garden of Eden, Pershing Square, Kate Douglas Wiggins, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Hotel Ramona, Washington Building, 311 South Spring, Tally’s Phonograph, Vitascope Parlor, 311 South Spring, Thomas L. Tally, Kinestoscope and Mutoscope machines, Thomas Edison’s Vitascope, phonograph parlor, S. Nordlinger and Sons Jewelry, 323 South Spring, Biddy Mason, 331 South Spring, Mary Ellen Pleasant, Robert and Rebecca Smith, San Bernardino, Texas, California was a free state, Mormon migration, first African-American, First African Methodist Episcopal Church, Biddy Mason Park, El Pueblo settlement, Governor Pio Pico, Boyle Heights district, Broadway Spring Garage, Tony Sheets, The Spirit of Growth, cactus entrance gate, Lankershim Building, Title Insurance Building, Ronald Reagan Building, 316 South Spring, Finkle Building, Kirk’s Military Shop, Kosher restaurant, James J. Jeffries, James J. Jeffries Gentleman’s Café, Jack Johnson, Reno, Nevada, The Great White Hope, Burbank, Knott’s Berry Farm, Wilderness Dance Hall, Jeffries’s alfalfa field, Burbank Machinist Union Hall, Ralphs supermarket, 340 South Spring, Waldeck’s Casino Theatre, architect Abraham Edelman, J. E. Waldeck, Hotchkiss Theatre, Empress Theatre, Quinn’s Empress Theatre, Biola Hall Theatre, Zendejas Theatre, Novel Theatre, Gore’s Capitol Theatre, Waxman’s Theatre, Waxman’s Capitol Theatre, Ronald Reagan Building, Ronald Reagan State Office Building, Ronald Reagan S.O.B., Welton Becket and Associates, Supreme Court of California, Herman Hellman Building, Rackendorf Germany, Wilmington, Hellman, Haas and Company, Nevada-California Bank, President of the Merchants National Bank, founder of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, President of the Congregation B’nai B’rith, Banco Popular Building, Bristol Room, Alfred Rosenheim, Angelus Hotel, Gustavus S. Holmes, Republican Party presidential candidate Calvin Coolidge, Warren Harding, Palace Hotel in San Francisco, Horne’s Nickelin Theatre, William T. Horne, 423 South Spring, Moorish styling, Zig-Zag Modern, 433 South Spring, Art Deco shell, Design Center of Los Angeles, Harris and Frank Building, Regent Theatre, Gaumont Chronophone, E. A. Fischer, Crocker Citizens National Bank Building, Parkinson and Bergstrom, Citizens National Bank, Spring Arts Tower, The Crocker Club, ghost bar, The Last Bookstore, The Braly/Continental Building, El Dorado Hotel, Stowell Hotel, Frederick Noonan, 416 South Spring, enameled brick and terra cotta, Edison Theatre nickelodeon, 629 South Broadway, Flora E. Hentz, John U. Zallee, Herman Theatre, Spring Street Park, nickelodeon theatres, Rowan and Chester Building, 131 West Fifth Street, Henry Kramer’s Dancing Academy, Chesterfield Club, Chester Building, developer Robert A. Rowan, The Alexandria Hotel. 210 West Fifth Street, Henry Neidboken’s grocery store, film colony, Hollywood, axis of the filmmaking universe, Silent Films, Mae West, Humphrey Bogart, Rudolph Valentino, Clark Gable, Greta Garbo, Sarah Bernhardt, Sid Grauman, Louis B. Mayer, Enrico Caruso, Charlie Chaplin, the Warner Brothers, Fatty Arbuckle, Fred Astaire, Ireland’s President Eamon de Valera, King Albert and Elizabeth of Belgium, Joan Crawford, Jack Dempsey, William Howard Taft, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Albert Clay Bilicke, Robert A. Rowan, Palm Court grand ballroom, RMS Lusitania, Ambassador Hotel, Charles Chaplin, Tom Mix, horse Tony, D. W. Griffith, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, League of Nations, Los Angeles Shrine Auditorium, Mack Sennett Bathing Beauties, Mack Sennett, Edendale, Echo Park, Los Felix, Silver Lake, Allesandro Street, Berkeley Avenue, Duane Street. Glendale Boulevard, Carole Lombard, Gloria Swanson, Sennett Keystone Studio, Phil Goldstone, Skid Row district, illicit drug transactions, prostitution, Orchestrion Theatre, Rose Theatre, 527 South Spring, Los Angeles Times Branch Office, Rosslyn Hotel, New Rosslyn, Beaux Arts, Los Angeles Board of Education, Mercantile Place, Spring Arcade Building, architects Kenneth MacDonald and Maurice Couchot, radio station KRKD, evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, Jack Dempsey, West Coast Manhattan Gym, Western Athletic Club, California State Athletic Commission, Pacific Southwest Bank Building, 215 West Sixth Street, John Parkinson and Edwin Bergstrom, Classical style with fluted columns, General Coco, Continental Building, Security Building, Security Trust and Savings, Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 South Spring, Greek-Revival style, President Trading Company, Los Angeles Theatre Center, City of Los Angeles, 522 South Spring, Scenic Theatre, Barney Oldfield, Jack Kipper, Western Athletic Club and Casino, McDevitt and Doyle, Incorporated, 534 South Spring, Bernie Dempsey, Isis Theatre, 542 South Spring, Turkish Bath operation, Transient Medicine Show, Punch ‘n Judy, Lloyd’s Bank Building, Mildred Davis, Clara Snyder, George and Walter Ralphs, Ralphs Brothers, 505 South Spring, 501-503 South Spring, 601-605 South Spring, Kroger Foods, George Ralphs, Judge Robert Widney, founding President of USC, Spring and Sixth Street Railroad, John Hollenbeck, Stephen Hubbell, Southern Pacific Railroad Station, Union Station, Hotel Hayward, Henderson Hayward, Charles Whittlesey, 601 South Spring, John and Donald Parkinson, Living Urban Museum of Electric and Neon Signs, Ground floor retail and upper floor residential living lofts, E. F. Hutton Building, Zig-Zag Moderne, 623 South Spring, California Canadian Bank, 625 South Spring, California Canadian Bank, Barclay’s Bank Building, 639 South Spring, Morgan, Walls and Morgan, Artist JR, Wrinkles of the City, Urban Artivist, Cartagena, Shanghai, Havana, Berlin, Istanbul, A. G. Bartlett Building, Parkinson and Bergstrom, Southwestern Law School, Grosse Building, the Abbot Kinney Building, United California Bank, 600 South Spring, Robert Vargas, Our Lady of DTLA, Los Angeles Stock Exchange Building, Moderne style, Samuel Lunden, Great Depression, New York Stock Exchange, Salvatore Caraino, Julian Ellsworth Garnsey, Wilson Studio, Pacific Stock Exchange, ExchangeLA, , Mortgage Guaranty Building, Sassony Building, Banks and Huntley Building, 632 South Spring, The Nonprofit Center, MALDEF, a Latino civil right organization, Hellman Commercial Trust and Savings Bank, Bank of America Headquarters, 650 South Spring, The Union Trust Company, Wells Fargo Bank, Farmers and Merchants Bank, Security First National Bank, Historic Skidrow District, poor, alcoholics, substance abusers, disenfranchised, mentally ill, Ozro Childs, Zanja Madre, Staples Center, Grammy Museum, Los Angeles Financial District, San Pedro harbor, I. N. 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